Hanyangling Mausoleum Museum

The Han Yang Ling (simplified Chinese汉阳陵traditional Chinese漢陽陵pinyinHàn Yáng líng), or the Yang Mausoleum of Han, is the mausoleum of Emperor Jing, the sixth emperor of the Western Han Dynasty and his Empress Wang. The mausoleum complex is located in the Weicheng district of the City of XianyangShaanxi Province, on the northern bank of the Wei River and about 20 km to the north of the city center of the provincial capital of Xi’an.

The Mausoleum of Emperor Jingdi (Hanyang Tomb), is a joint mausoleum of Liu Qi (188 -141 BC), the fourth emperor of the Western Han Dynasty, and his wife Empress Wang. It is located at Zhanjiawan Village, about 20 kilometers north of Xian City, where Emperor Jingdi of Western Han Dynasty was buried.

During the 17-year reign of Emperor Jingdi, he developed a peaceful relationship with the Huns (nomads to the north of China) through intermarriage, and reduced the burden of tax, corvee and penalty, by which way Han economy developed rapidly after the turmoil at the end of Qin Dynasty. So he is remembered as a capable emperor in Chinese history, together with his father Emperor Wendi, opened a golden era of harmony in the early feudal society, which was later regarded as “the Great Reign of Wen and Jing”.

The total area of the mausoleum is 20 square meters and the construction time is as long as 28 years from 153 BC to 126 BC. The entire complex is designed in line with the imperial state powers and their predominant hierarchic ranks, taking the Emperor’s graveyard as the very center, scattered around it are burial pits, archaeological exhibitions, criminal graveyard and some satellite tombs.

The Mausoleum of Emperor Jingdi was excavated in 1972 which was the beginning of the excavation of Hanyang Mausoleum. In 2007, the underground Protection Hall covering ten burial pits east of the emperor’s tomb mound with an area of 8000 square meters, was opened to public. It has been modernized with heated glass wall and tunnel to separate the relics and visitors into two areas of different temperature and humidity aimed to protect and maintain the relics on a large scale while allowing visitors to view the relics at different angles within a short distance in the mysterious environment. A large amount of colored pottery figurines and other items are displayed here.

WANGDA SHOWCASES designed,supplied and installed all the customized museum grade display cases|museum showcase|museum display cabinets|vitrines for the mausoleum museum of the renowned Emperor over 2000 years ago.

Guang Dong Provincial Museum

Wangda Showcases customized museum display cases|museum showcases|museum display cabinets for GuangDong Provincial Museum.

The Guangdong Provincial Museum was located on 215 Wenming Rd., GuangzhouGuangdong Province of China, on which was the original site of Sun Yat-sen University. It was a provincial general museum, founded in 1959 and with a land area of 43,000 square meters. It comprised three major parts: the museum, the relic of first national congress of Kuomintang and Lu Xun Memorial House. Other affiliated buildings include the Red Tower (红楼) and the observatory of Sun Yat-sen University.There are two separate buildings. The building which housed the original National Sun Yat-sen University became the Lu Xun Memorial Hall and contains an exhibition of objects related to Lu Xun and some other intellectuals who influenced Chinese modernization and indirectly prepared the way for the communist revolution.




















Xuxieke Museum(Private Museum)

WANGDA SHOWCASES customized museum display cases|museum showcases|museum display cabinets|vitrines for Xuxiake Museum, a renowned private museum.Xu Xiake (Chinese徐霞客pinyinXú XiákèWade–GilesHsü Hsia-k’o, January 5, 1587 – March 8, 1641), born Xu Hongzu (徐弘祖), courtesy name Zhenzhi (振之), was a Chinese travel writer and geographerof the Ming dynasty (1368–1644), known best for his famous geographical treatise, and noted for his bravery and humility. He traveled throughout China for more than 30 years, documenting his travels extensively. The records of his travels were compiled posthumously in The Travel Diaries Xu Xiake, and his work translated by Ding Wenjiang.[1] Xu’s writing falls under the old Chinese literary category of ‘travel record literature’ (‘youji wenxue’“遊記文學”), which used narrative and prose styles of writing to portray one’s travel experiences.[2]