WANGDA SHOWCASES Won Museum Showcases project for Palace of Great Benevolence of Palace Museum

WANGDA Showcases successfully won the museum showcases project for Palace of Great Benevolence for Palace Museum, the national-class museum project. Palace of Great Benevolence, one of the ‘Six Eastern Palaces’. These palaces were the living quarters for the imperial concubines and their staffs. Most of the palaces have been turned into exhibition halls for the display of Chinese treasures collected by the imperial family. Palace of Great Benevolence (Jingrengong) houses an exhibition of more than five hundred ancient Chinese bronzes.

The Forbidden City is a palace complex in central Beijing, China. The former Chinese imperial palace from the Ming dynasty to the end of the Qing dynasty (the years 1420 to 1912), it now houses the Palace Museum. The Forbidden City served as the home of emperors and their households as well as the ceremonial and political center of Chinese government for almost 500 years.

Al Thani Exhibition Project

For the tour exhibition of Al Thani collections, a world-wide renowned collection from the Roal Family of Katar, a renowned Design & Architect company from France, together with the lighting and security professionals from UK and France paid a visit to Wangda Showcases,with a due diligence tour at our workshops and showrooms in addition to a comprehensive survey for our delivered museum display case projects for other museums.The visit come with the detailed discussion for the project cooperation,technology and security details for involved high-end display cases for the world-renowned Al Thani Exhibition.

Exhibition in National War Museum & National Military History Museum of Malta

The Exhibition at National War Museum and National Military History Museum of Malta.All the high-end museum display cases are custom-built by Wangda Showcases.

Hosted by Fort St Elmo, the National War Museum houses a superb collection of items which takes us back to prehistoric times. Artifacts are displayed in chronological order, commencing from the early phases of the Bronze Age around 2,500 B.C.